21 Of The Healthiest Fish You And I Should Eat More Often

Fish has been an important source of protein for humans ever since the caveman days. Nutrients and minerals, especially omega 3 fatty acids, found in fish greatly improves brain development and reproduction. Did you know that fish contributes to the average lifespan of a human being? Just look at this chart. Japan and Iceland are 2 brilliant examples of countries where residents consume fish almost daily. Below are 21 of the healthiest fishes you can commonly find that you and I should consume more often.

Do take a look at these vitamains and minerals chart to further understand what they are good for.

  1. Anchovies
  2. A can of European anchovies in oil, drain of solids is :

    • a good source of Calcium, Iron and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Niacin and Selenium.

  3. Butterfish
  4. Butterfish cooked in dry heat is :

    • a good source of Niacin, Vitamin B12 and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein and Selenium.

  5. Catfish
  6. Farmed catfish cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Sodium
    • a good source of Thiamin, Phosphorus and Selenium,
    • a very good source of Protein and Vitamin B12.

  7. Clam
  8. Clam cooked in moist heat is :

    • very low in Saturated Fat
    • a good source of Riboflavin, Niacin, Potassium and Zinc.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, Iron, Phosphorus, Copper, Manganese and Selenium.

  9. Crab
  10. Blue crab cooked in moist heat is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Niacin, Folate and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12, Zinc, Copper and Selenium.

  11. Crayfish
  12. Farmed crayfish cooked in moist heat is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Zinc and Manganese.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12, Phosphorus, Copper and Selenium.

  13. Croaker
  14. Atlantic croaker breaded and fried is :

    • a good source of Vitamin B12.
    • a very good source of protein and selenium.

  15. Herring
  16. Atlantic herring cooked under dry heat is :

    • a good source of Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12 and Selenium.

  17. Mullet
  18. Mullet cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Sodium.
    • a good source of Vitamin B6 and Phosphorus
    • a very good source of Protein, Niacin and Selenium.

  19. Oyster
  20. Raw farmed eastern oyster is :

    • a good source of Protein, Vitamin C, Thiamin, Niacin, Magnesium and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Vitamin B12, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese and Selenium.

  21. Ocean Perch
  22. Ocean perch cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12 and Calcium.
    • a very good source of Protein, Phosphorus and Selenium.

  23. Pollock
  24. Atlantic pollock cooked in dry heat is :

    • very low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Magnesium and Potassium.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12, Phosphorus and Selenium.

  25. Salmon
  26. Raw atlantic salmon is :

    • low in Sodium.
    • a good source of Thiamin, Riboflavin, Pantothenic Acid and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12 and Selenium.

  27. Sardine
  28. Atlantic sardine canned in oil, drained of solids with bone is :

    • a good source of Niacin and Calcium.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, Phosphorus and Selenium.

  29. Scallop
  30. Steamed bay and sea scallops are :

    • very low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Vitamin B12, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Copper.
    • a very good source of Protein, Phosphorus and Selenium.

  31. Shrimp
  32. Shrimp cooked in moist heat is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Niacin, Iron, Phosphorus and Zinc.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12 and Selenium.

  33. Squid
  34. Fried squid is :

    • a good source of Riboflavin, Vitamin B12 and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Copper and Selenium.

  35. Tilapia
  36. Tilapia cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Sodium.
    • a good source of Niacin and Phosphorus.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12 and Selenium.

  37. Trout
  38. Trout cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Sodium.
    • a good source of Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Phosphorus and Selenium.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12 and Manganese.

  39. Whitefish
  40. Smoked whitefish is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Niacin, Vitamin B6, Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Selenium.
    • a very good source of Protein and Vitamin B12.

  41. Whiting
  42. Whiting fish cooked in dry heat is :

    • low in Saturated Fat.
    • a good source of Potassium.
    • a very good source of Protein, Vitamin B12, Phosphorus and Selenium.

Are You Aware Of These 6 Types Of Fat?

Fat is necessary. It acts as a nutrient to maintain normal body functions. It is an energy source, used in production of membranes and also hormonal compositions that help regulate blood pressure, heart rate, blood vessel constriction, blood clotting and the nervous system. Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat soluble and can only be digested, absorbed, and transported in conjunction with fats. Other contributions include keeping the hair and skin healthy and insulating the organs against shock.

Fat also serves as a useful intermediary towards a host of diseases. When a particular substance, whether chemical or biotic, reaches unsafe levels in the bloodstream, the body can effectively dilute the offending substances by storing it in new fat tissue. This helps to protect vital organs, until such time as the offending substances can be metabolized and removed from the body by means of excretion, urination, accidental or intentional bloodletting, sebum excretion or hair growth.

An average human body needs at most 1 tablespoon, about 15g, of fat a day. An average American takes in 5 tablespoons, which is of course too much. It will lead to weight gain, obesity and eventually a host of diseases. Here are 9 examples of the types of diseases caused by obesity. However, it is also important to identify the types of fat that are found in food. Some are good, some are bad. Below are the explanation for the 6 types of fat found normally in food.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids
  2. A type of polyunsaturated fat that does not raise cholesterol levels and is most beneficial to the human body. Benefits of omega-3 fatty acids include :

    • reducing the risk of coronary heart diseases
    • aiding in mental disorders like aggression and ADHD
    • decreasing the thickness of the carotid arteries
    • improving in blood flow in patients with unhealthy blood sugar levels
    • helping lower blood pressure
    • protecting the heart against irregular heartbeats

    The ideal daily dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed 1 tablespoon, about 5g. To be more exact, less than 3g from fish and less than 2g from nutritional supplements. The list of sources high in omega-3 are :

    • wild salmon
    • herring
    • mackerel
    • anchovies
    • sardines
    • chia
    • flax (6 times richer than fish)
    • kiwifruit

  3. Omega-6 Fatty Acids
  4. Omega-6 fatty acids, another type of polyunsaturated fat, have been shown to be beneficial in the reduction of cholesterol levels when they are substituted for saturated fats in a person’s diet. The benefit in consuming omega-6 fatty acids therefore lies in the fact that they reduce the incidence of coronary artery disease, which is a condition where excess cholesterol builds up on the arteries of the heart, eventually blocking the flow of blood and causing a heart attack.

    The optimum omega-6 intake should be at most 4 times the amount of omega-3 taken, to avoid the probability of side effects such as depression and diseases. Sources rich in omega-6 include:

    • Corn
    • Soybean
    • Cottonseed oil, most vegetable oils actually
    • Nuts
    • Cereals
    • Whole grain breads
    • Eggs and poultry
    • Baked goods

  5. Monounsaturated Fat
  6. Olive oil, consumed widely in Mediterranean countries, is one of the reasons why these countries have lower levels of heart diseases. The reason lies in its ability to lower cholesterol and assist in reducing heart diseases. Monounsaturated fat keeps skin healthy and helps in developing body cells. Vitamin E is a type of fat soluble antioxidant found a lot in monounsaturated fat.

    Sources rich in monounsaturated fats include :

    • Avocados
    • Canola oil
    • Grapeseed oil
    • Ground nut oil
    • Oatmeal
    • Olive oil
    • Nuts like almonds, cashews, pecans, pistachios
    • Popcorn
    • Safflower oil
    • Sesame oil
    • Sunflower oil
    • Tea-oil Camellia

  7. Saturated Fat
  8. Raises LDL cholesterol levels, increases risk of heart disease, and may increase risk of colon and prostate cancer. Foods with 1g or less saturated fat per serving are considered low in saturated fat. Examples of food high in saturated fat include :

    • Butter
    • Ghee
    • Lard
    • Coconut oil
    • Cottonseed oil
    • Palm kernel oil
    • Dairy products, especially cream and cheese
    • Meat

  9. Trans Fat
  10. Trans fat is not required by our body plus it is not healthy. Essentially, a trans fatty acid is an unsaturated fat turned into a saturated fat. Trans fat is evil as it increases the risk of coronary heart diseases, raises LDL cholesterol levels, lowers HDL levels and may increase risk of breast cancer, diabetes and infertility.

    Trans fat can be found a lot in :

    • Processed foods; snacks, crackers and chips done using hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil
    • Baked goods; muffins, cookies and cakes done using hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil
    • Stick margarines
    • Shortening
    • Fast food items like french fries

  11. Dietry Cholesterol
  12. A human body is designed to naturally construct all of the cholesterol it needs, but cholesterol is also found in meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, lard and butter.

    There are 2 types of cholesterol, namely :

    • LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein)
    • BAD because they keep cholesterol circulating in the blood, causing the arteries to become clogged with deposits.

    • HDL (High Density Lipoprotein)
    • GOOD because they move cholesterol away from artery walls and back to the liver.

Vitamin D Is The Most Common Vitamin Deficiency In The World

It is a major health risk and a common cause of many diseases and disorders.

There are 3 types of vitamin D namely D1, D2 and D3. Vitamin D3 is the type that can only be produced in skin that is exposed to sunlight. It is one of the only vitamins produced naturally by the body. To have the body produce adequate amounts, an average of 1 hour exposure to sunlight per week is needed. Surprisingly, many people are still not producing the beneficial amounts.

Vitamin D deficiency is proven to lead to 3 main diseases which are

  1. Rickets
  2. childhood disease characterized by impeded growth, and deformity, of the long bones.

  3. Osteomalacia
  4. a bone-thinning disorder that occurs exclusively in adults and is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and bone fragility.

  5. Osteoporosis
  6. a condition characterized by reduced bone mineral density and increased bone fragility.

Vitamin D malnutrition is also linked to several chronic diseases like high blood pressure, tuberculosis, cancer, periodontal disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, depression, schizophrenia, seasonal affective disorder and several autoimmune diseases.

Be aware of the risks involved. Get some sun. The older you get the more you need it.

Here’s the recommended daily vitamin D intake according to the US Dietary Reference Intake.

  • 1 to 50 year olds = 5 micrograms/day or 200 IU/day (IU is the International Unit for measuring vitamins)
  • 51 to 70 year olds = 10 micrograms/day or 400 IU/day
  • Past 70 year olds = 15 micrograms/day or 600 IU/day

Other facts about vitamin D absorption that you should know are :

  • Obese individuals may have lower levels of the circulating form of vitamin D, probably because of reduced bioavailability, and are at higher risk of deficiency.
  • Patients with chronic liver disease or intestinal malabsorption disorders may also require larger doses of vitamin D (up to 40,000 IU or 1 mg (1000 micrograms) daily).
  • The use of sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 8 inhibits more than 95% of vitamin D production in the skin
  • Dark-skinned individuals tend to block more sunlight to be absorbed even at higher latitudes, thereby increasing the risk of vitamin D deficiency.
  • Individuals such as certain female residents of conservative Muslim nations in the Middle East clad in full body coverings during all their outdoor activity are at much higher risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Food that is rich in vitamin D are :

  • 3 ounces of mushrooms exposed to 5 minutes of UV light after harvesting provides 2700 IU. This is one of the very few natural sources for vegetarians.
  • 1 tablespoon of cod liver oil provides 1,360 IU. Most fish liver oil has the same amount.
  • 3 ounces / 85 grams of catfish brings 425 IU.
  • 3.5 ounces of cooked salmon supplies 360 IU.
  • 3.5 ounces of cooked mackerel gives 345 IU.
  • 1.75 ounces of drained sardines canned in oil produces 250 IU.
  • 3 ounces of tuna canned in oil presents 200 IU.
  • 3.5 ounces of cooked eel yields 200 IU.
  • A glass of vitamin D fortified milk contains 100 IU.
  • 1 whole egg supplies about 20 IU.

Having enough vitamin D in the body contributes to a lot of benefits including

  • regulating calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood by promoting their absorption from food in the intestines, and by promoting re-absorption of calcium in the kidneys.
  • promoting bone formation and mineralization and is essential in the development of an intact and strong skeleton.
  • inhibiting parathyroid hormone secretion from the parathyroid gland. Excessive secretion leads to kidney diseases.
  • affecting the immune system by promoting immunosuppression, phagocytosis, and anti-tumor activity.